tx almanac facebook link

Sports

Prosper players and fans celebrate victory in their 2008 AAA championship game. Photo by Louis DeLuca.

STATE: High School Football Championships

The University Interscholastic League, which governs literary and athletic competition among schools in Texas, was organized in 1910 as a division of the University of Texas extension service. Initially, it sponsored forensic competition. By 1920, the UIL organized the structure of the high school football game in response to the growing popularity of the sport in Texas. Town football teams had begun competing around the state in the early 1890s.

From 1920 until 1947, the UIL named only one state football champion for the larger schools. Smaller schools were limited to regional titles. Beginning in 1948, champions were named by divisions based on school enrollment, with the introduction of City, AA and A divisions.

Over the years, other adjustments have been made in determining the divisions, so that today the divisions range from 6-Man competition for the smaller schools to the largest 5A schools. In the 1990s, subdivisions were added within 2A-5A divisions, with the larger schools included in the Division I. Subdivisions were added to the two other divisions for the season competition in 2006.

Following are listed the champions by UIL division, along with the runner up, and the points scored by each team in the championship game. Included in years 1940-68 are the teams competing in the Prairie View Interscholastic League (PVIL, first called the Interscholastic League of Colored Schools). Between 1965 and 1968, the schools were integrated into the UIL.

(OT refers to overtime.) Sources: The University Interscholastic League at www.uil.utexas and other sources.

 

2013 high school football champs
High School football champions 2012

 
For a complete list of UIL
 football champions, beginning in 1920, . . . 

Private Schools Football Champions . . .

Boys High School Basketball Champions . . .

Girls High School Basketball Champions . . .

Private Schools Basketball Champions . . .

 

Professional Sports in Texas

Big-time professional basketball arrived in Texas in 1967 with the formation of the American Basketball Association, which placed franchises in Dallas and Houston. By 1973, the Dallas Chaparrals had moved to San Antonio to become the Spurs. . . .

Professional football first arrived in Texas in the fall of 1952 when a 16-member syndicate purchased the National Football League franchise that had been known as the New York Yanks. The team, coached by Jim Phelan, enjoyed little success playing in the Cotton Bowl as the Dallas Texans. . . .

Major league baseball came to Texas when the National League awarded two franchises in 1961, one to New York (Mets) and the other to Houston and Roy Hofheinz, who named the team the Colt .45s. . . .

Over 100 communities in Texas have hosted a professional baseball team. The Texas League, established in 1888, has been the most well-known and continuous circuit for the larger cities of San Antonio, Houston, Fort Worth, Dallas, Beaumont, El Paso, Waco, Wichita Falls and Midland. . . .

Rube Foster, who was born and raised in Calvert, is credited with the formation of the Negro National League in 1920. Foster started playing for amateur and semiprofessional teams in the late 1800s and early 1900s, primarily with teams from Waco and Fort Worth. . . .

 

 

Olympic champion Jeremy Wariner

Texas Olympic Medalists

Jeremy Wariner, who won medals in 2004 and 2008, graduated from Lamar High School in Arlington and attended Baylor University. Photo by Phil McElhinney (CC-BY-SA). . . .

 

Texas Sports Hall of Fame

The Texas Sports Hall of Fame was organized in 1951 by the Texas Sports Writers Association. Each year the honorees are inducted into the Hall of Fame at a gala dinner. (The second such fete in 1952 was headlined by, “That filmland athlete, Ronald Reagan, and his actress wife, Nancy Davis.” [The Dallas Morning News] ) . . .

 

The Southwest Conference

For much of its 82 years, the Southwest Conference gloried in its distinction as the most tightly knit league in major college sports. Its excitement and energy generated from deep in the heart of Texas. . . .

 

 

 

Texas Almanac

Texas Almanac