Wolf's Crossing

Wolf's Crossing was on the Colorado River seven miles west of Marble Falls in southwestern Burnet County. It grew up around a low-water crossing on the Wolf family farm. A post office was established there in 1874 with James P. Noble as postmaster. By the mid-1880s Wolf's Crossing had a gristmill, a cotton gin, three general stores, and 100 residents; wool and cotton were the principal commodities shipped from the area. James P. and Amanda Noble gave an acre of land for a school in 1884. The school, originally called Wolf's Crossing School, came to be known as Lavista by the 1890s. It had one teacher and thirty-four students in 1896 and was consolidated with the Marble Falls Independent School District in 1949. The population of Wolf's Crossing fell to fifty in the early 1890s, probably because the Austin and Northwestern Railroad chose a river crossing a few miles upriver when the Fairland-Llano section of the railroad, finished in 1892, was built. The post office at Wolf's Crossing was discontinued in 1893, and mail for the community was sent to Sandy Mount in Llano County. Portions of the Wolf's Crossing site were submerged by Lake Lyndon B. Johnson when Wirtz Dam was completed in the 1951. The remaining areas were developed as subdivisions and lake resorts.

Adapted from the official Handbook of Texas, a state encyclopedia developed by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA). It is an authoritative source of trusted historical records.

Belongs to

Wolf's Crossing is part of or belongs to the following places.

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Currently Exists

No

Place type

Wolf's Crossing is classified as a Town

Locations

  • Latitude
    30.61963110
    Longitude
    -98.39391610

Has Post Office

No

Is Incorporated

No

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